Author Topic: Wrong setting or wrong lens?  (Read 3096 times)

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Offline balacau

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Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« on: January 02, 2011, 04:30:13 PM »
I went for a wander today down a "public footpath" which I hadn't been down for a couple of years and was amazed by how much had changed!  My "kit" for the day consisted of a Sigma 18mm "Zen" prime, Sigma 50mm F1.4 prime, Tamron 90mm macro and Sony Reflex 500mm mirror. 

Neither the 18mm Zen or the mirror were used today.

Anyway, I tried taking a couple of snaps of the "natural enclosed pathway.  The trees and high hawthorn hedges have reached a point when they form a tunnel which makes an interesting shot.  However the 50mm lens performs poorly at this, the images can explain this better than I can.  Perhaps its a subject better covered with the manual focus or another lens altogether?




The nearest branches and floor covering is pretty sharp on my screen but the rest is out of focus.  This might be useful for other image types but I was hoping it would all be sharp.  Perhaps this is the wrong scene for a prime lens?  Any suggestions as to what I should be using in this case?  Weather permitting, another attempt can be made tomorrow!

Best regards

Gavin
a580 dSLR & a55 dSLT and a bundle of lenses to keep me happy

Offline Clive

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Re: Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2011, 07:24:47 PM »
Gavin

Interesting subject. If you are looking for a deep DOF (all the way back) there are two ways to do this. Both involve a tripod. Shoot on the tripod at f11, f16 or f22 to get a deep DOF. This will slow the shutter way down, thus the tripod. I'd use manual focus for sure.

Secondly, you can take three or five images each one focused on a different plane. Then you can "stack" these in Photoshop. The process selects "in focus" zones from each image and merges them. Others can tell you how to do this.

BTW..both of these don't work well in the wind.

A brighter sky (yeah, sunshine) would add definition to the branches. Unfortunately sunshine is not "on demand." ;)

Good luck

Clive
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 07:28:22 PM by Clive »
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Offline balacau

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Re: Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2011, 08:13:46 PM »
Hi Clive

Many thanks for your suggestions.  I should be able to try and hand-held shoot the same picture at F8.  We're expecting rain/snow showers tomorrow and with 2 full days to go before I'm back at work; time is limited! 

I don't think it would be as "fun" if the sunshine was on tap!  Beating the weather and still coming away with great shots is something of a game in itself.

Best regards

Gavin
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Offline Rob aka [minolta mad]

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Re: Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2011, 08:16:30 PM »
Another thing to try is shooting further back and using a longer focal length to 'emphasise' the tunnel effect.
Being very close to where the tunnel is doesnt usually produce the effect you are after.
Its also worth shooting from a lower angle as well.
But as Clive says, a small appeture of at least f/13 -f/16 is a must.


Rob

Offline balacau

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Re: Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2011, 08:23:39 PM »
Aperture setting F16, use of a tripod and lower-level shots!  Ok, that's noted!

As a side experiment, I'll see if I can get a comparison shot between the Sigma 50mm F1.4 and Sigma 18mm F3.5 "Zen". 

I doubt there'll be that much of a notable difference apart from the wide FoV which the 18mm lens offers.

Thanks!

Best regards

Gavin
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 08:41:54 PM by balacau »
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Offline Oldy Baldy

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Re: Wrong setting or wrong lens?
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2011, 11:25:16 PM »
hello and happynew year I have a similar shot at a local nature reserve and I use my 50mm Minolta 1.7 as the light is never bright and I can  take advantage of the lens by ramping up the ISO and still get a reasonable shutter speed as if the shutter speed is slow you will always get blurring from the movement of the trees in the breeze hope this helps
John
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