Author Topic: Turning off manual mode  (Read 3986 times)

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Offline tpe

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Turning off manual mode
« on: June 11, 2010, 08:58:05 AM »
Do you switch from manual to aperture P or even auto when before switching off your camera?

This morning there were a bunch of pigions sitting on a grating in the pavement where warm air comes up from the subway. It is something that i have considered taking a shot of many times, and today i had time to stop.

So i framed the subject and set the camera to f4.5 and there was a nice 1/250th of a second shutter speed so took a couple of shots with what i thought was the protagonist in focus. Then i looked a the shots and they were all under exposed. I had left the camera in manual again and missed the shot because of it, quite a regular occurrence for me.

So do you keep your camera in manual all the time and know you have to change to another mode if you need to make a quick shot,
do you keep it in another mode so you are ready to get a shot instantly if needed,
do you always remember to change back to default settings after you have been doing something odd,
or do you just make the same mistake as me?

Or do youhave another method for making sure you have the right settings when you occasionally see a shot that needs a quick responce?


Tim

Offline winjeel

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 12:32:13 PM »
I have the same problem. I discovered that you can use a flash whilst the camera is set on bulb!
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Offline peterf

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2010, 12:45:34 PM »
Done that same thing too many times. I try to remember to switch to aperture priority before shutting down. I prefer this for most of my shooting.
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Offline tpe

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2010, 01:00:16 PM »
Andrew
"I have the same problem. I discovered that you can use a flash whilst the camera is set on bulb!"
That could be annoying, especially as you probably had to wait 30 seconds for the shutter to close and then another for the noise to be removed :).

Peter, yes me too, but still sometimes find my self taking pictures at f22 in th emiddle of the night!!!.

Tim


Offline paul_b

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2010, 01:50:23 PM »
I try to remember to set it to ISO 200, AWB and P. Missed/spoiled too many shots when I don't. Some times its before shutting down, quite often its after copying the images to the PC and formatting the card which I like to do soon after getting home.
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Offline Clive

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2010, 02:40:17 PM »
"do you just make the same mistake as me?" Yup! That happens. ;)

Mine is on A mode 95 percent of the time and switched to M when desired.

For "pressure" shots I screw up on occasion and forget to check assorted functions ... see something (pigeons) and start shooting. Ooops. You are not alone. 

However, usually when I pick up the camera for a walk or a special photo trip, I have trained myself to switch the camera on and take a shot of something (the trees across the street) and then check all of the settings to make sure it is all good: ISO, A mode, aperture at what I think I need...

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Offline G-Mike

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2010, 03:23:14 PM »
I generally don't pay too much attention to settings on power off.  I tend to turn my A100 on and instinctively look at the display, glance at the ISO setting (usually 100-200) and see if I am in aperture priority (most of the time) and then make adjustments based on why I turned the camera on in the first place. I am also one of those persons who turns the camera off and on pretty frequently when I'm out and about.
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Offline rannari

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2010, 04:41:51 PM »
It has happened many times. I have three predefined settings: one for HI-speed shooting (ISO 400, f4.0, drive Hi-speed , center focusing etc.), one for normal Aperture mode (ISO 160, f5.6 etc.) and one for low light (ISO 800, f4.5 etc.). I'll keep my camera most of the time in position '1' (the normal Aperture mode).

This has been a good approach for me ... not so many lost opportunities.

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Offline Stef.

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2010, 05:17:50 PM »
I usually have my camera in A mode; ISO 200; sss to on; wb ->daylight. I have also programmed some memory settings for special shooting conditions such as high ISO. Usually I don't forget to set my camera to these settings but sometimes I forget to switch sss back on when having used a tripod.
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Offline Rob aka [minolta mad]

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2010, 08:33:34 PM »
Quote
Or do you have another method for making sure you have the right settings when you occasionally see a shot that needs a quick responce?

Thats where the A700 comes in handy, this is always set to A mode.
The A900 is always left in manual, sss off, MLU (been caught out with this before) and M focussing.


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Offline zekewhipper

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2010, 05:18:56 AM »
I do the same as Paul.
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Offline Theresa

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2010, 11:34:22 PM »
I don't use manual very often but I do use P most of the time.  This allows me to adjust either the aperture or shutter and still get auto exposure while setting ISO manually.  I find auto to be useless.  There was a time I used a Pentax spot meter, which I still have and used the zone system.  I no longer feel a need for this what with histograms.  Discipline for disciplines sake is not something I find attractive any more.  The tools have gotten better so I use them, even medium format sees auto exposure as a necessary feature.  I have to say though that the process of using a spot meter with the zone system was not too much of a chore once I mastered it.  But I sent my 4"x5" view camera to my daughter who is an artist and graduated from Interlochen and is now in Cambridge studying at Harvard.  I should send her the light meter too.  She loves photography, music, and writing.  She has far more potential than I ever did.

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Offline wildieswife

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2010, 12:19:37 AM »
I always have mine on manual these days. Once upon a time it was always in Aperture priority.  If I'm out and abouting with wildlife I keep it on A when I'm walking if I have the 300mm on - just in case there's a grab shot. When I'm in situ I try to use the best manual take on the light opportunities.

Recently because I've been doing Macros I always have it on manual and juggle around like mad to get the best of what's on offer. Insects, like birds, are rarely co-operative as regards light situations ;)

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Offline Akshay Jamwal

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2010, 10:27:36 PM »
Most DSLRs will serve you some sort of warning when you're underexposing or overexposing by more than a couple of stops, regardless of what shooting mode you're in. Usually there's some sort of blinking indicator on your exposure compensation scale in the viewfinder.
Not to sound pedantic or anything, but quickly flitting your eye over all the info in the viewfinder display right before hitting the shutter release button is a good habit.
I've been guilty of getting caught in the moment and completely ignoring my own above advice at times, but I certainly don't do it as often as I used to, say, 5 years ago.

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Offline pointblank

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Re: Turning off manual mode
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2010, 05:23:33 AM »
 I think we all suffer memory losses when it comes down to settings. Mostly shooting in A mode but sometimes have some issues where the camera is still on 2 seconds timer making me wonder my the shot is not being produced. If you wish to prepare for that sudden shot that comes along I think the best way is to train yourself in setting it to full auto every time you shut off your camera.