Author Topic: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?  (Read 4918 times)

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Offline balacau

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Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« on: April 23, 2011, 03:16:34 PM »
All of the instructions I've read considering using an SLR on a tripod (especially during night shots) says to turn the SSS off during shooting.

I really don't have enough experience in night shots so I don't quite understand the in's and out's of it but why must you turn the SSS off when using a tripod?  How will it affect the camera/images if you don't?

Just curious!

Best regards

Gavin
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Offline REX (aka TG)

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2011, 03:41:37 PM »
All manufactures says that you have to turn off image stabilizer/AS/SSS etc. The reason is because the system will try to detect movement and if there is no movement it will generate from alone the system while is trying to detect a movement.

Sometimes i dint change it i leave it most of the times on and i just watch the bar inside the viewfinder and when is at the lowest level i just tip the camera to make AS/SSS detect that there is movement. :)
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Offline Rob aka [minolta mad]

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2011, 07:14:12 PM »
It does make a difference whether or not the SSS is turned on or off when tripod mounted. I did a test some time ago and posted the images.
I will try to find the post.

I always have mine turned off when tripod mounted and always use mirror lock up as well.


Rob

Offline balacau

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2011, 08:28:36 PM »
It does make a difference whether or not the SSS is turned on or off when tripod mounted. I did a test some time ago and posted the images.
I will try to find the post.

I always have mine turned off when tripod mounted and always use mirror lock up as well.


Rob

Hi Rob

I think I have found one of two threads which cover this topic.
http://www.dynaxdigital.com/taking-photos/mirror-lock-up-sample-images/
http://www.dynaxdigital.com/sony-alpha-300-330-350-380-discussion/mirror-lock-up-8365/

The next time I do any night shots, I'll try taking an image with SSS on, and the second with it off.  I'd love to see myself just how different the results are.

As far as MLU is concerned, is it safe to assume that the a580 will enable this automatically when a long-exposure shot is being fired?  Its not something I've even used before but if it helps the quality of imagery, then I'm all for giving it a bash.

Best regards

Gavin
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Offline REX (aka TG)

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2011, 09:38:17 PM »
A dedicate MLU function has only the a900/850. With A700 is available only in 2 sec timer.With the others cameras i dint know if they support in 2 sec timer MLU
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Offline Faldrax

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2011, 10:36:20 PM »
All of the instructions I've read considering using an SLR on a tripod (especially during night shots) says to turn the SSS off during shooting.

I really don't have enough experience in night shots so I don't quite understand the in's and out's of it but why must you turn the SSS off when using a tripod?  How will it affect the camera/images if you don't?

Just curious!

Best regards

Gavin

My understanding of this (from thinking about it for a while, rather than reading anything specific) is as follows;

When mounted on a good tripod, the camera should be stable, and so SSS should not be required.
If the system were perfect, it would detect no movement, and so hold the sensor steady (relative to the steady camera). 
Unfortunately, electronics are not perfect, and even in high quality systems such as those used on DSLR, any circuit will have some 'noise' - when shooting hand-held, this will be (I assume) relatively insignificant compared to signals generated by camera movement - but when on a tripod, they will cause some small movement of the sensor when not required - which will be prevented by switching the system off.
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Offline rannari

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Re: Tripod & SSS on dSLR body?
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2011, 08:27:45 AM »
I always have mine turned off when tripod mounted and always use mirror lock up as well.

Me too. Last time I "tested" (accidental malfunction in my brain ;-) ) this behaviour was at winter time when taking night shots. Clear difference if you use SSS with tripod.

kurt
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