Author Topic: RAW vs JPEG  (Read 2146 times)

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Offline urkrnboy90

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RAW vs JPEG
« on: December 12, 2008, 11:24:45 PM »
I noticed that the RAW formatted photos are seen upon with a much higher caliber than compared to JPEG formatted photos. However, the issue with me is that I want to have the same RAW quality images but in a format where I can upload them to flickr, facebook, etc.

Is this possible? And how?
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Offline fother

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Re: RAW vs JPEG
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2008, 11:37:12 PM »

Not the RAW files themselves - you need to convert them to JPG (and yes, using RAW gives you more flexibility to adjust white balance, exposure, etc etc than using JPG straight from the camera).

How to do it depends on the software you have available - what have you got? :)

Offline urkrnboy90

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Re: RAW vs JPEG
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2008, 11:46:46 PM »
I'm using Sony's Image Data Converter SR.
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Offline winjeel

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Re: RAW vs JPEG
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2008, 11:48:47 PM »
Hi, and welcome to the forums. Everyone has their own favourite procedure or means of dealing with their images. This is one way:
- Set your camera to RAW + Jpeg
- Use the RAW files for the high quality images
- jpeg for quick and easy stuff.

Also, it's a sad fact that people will steal images and use them for their own purposes, without crediting you, or rewarding you. And in America, there was talk of new copyright legislation that would consider 'divorced' images as being free from copyright. So, because of these things, I always put some sort of ownership mark on my images. The other thing I do is 'resize' them, making them smaller. You can see a tutorial I made here.

On this forum we have a rule that all images must be 800x800 maximum size, and no more that 200kb. This, I've found to be too big for my monitor. Generally, about 500x500-ish pixels is good. With the above tutorial, it explains how to do that in both Picasa (free from Google), and in other regular programs (at the bottom of that page).

With Flickr (I'm not a user, so someone else would probably give you better info than I), I think you can only upload jpeg. So, you'd do all the fine tuning and adjustments with the raw file, add a copyright mark of some sort, resize it, and then save as JPEG, then upload it to Flickr.

If you use smaller files, then it's harder for others to steal and use without your permission. If someone or someones begin to use a picture, each time they move it it is resaved. Jpegs use compression each time they are saved, which means the file becomes smaller, and smaller, and the quality gets less and less each time it's saved. Making the stolen image less and less usable. Whereas with TIFF, the image size and quality never changes.

If you post images here on these forums and for other web use, it's best to use jpeg so you can easily stay under the 200kb limit. The quality, on one save (to your computer), and one move (to flickr) is virtually unchanged. Jpegs have many other advantages, and I use a mix of raw, tiff, and jpeg, with jpeg being my most commonly used format.

Hope this helps
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