Author Topic: martial arts photography?  (Read 10389 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Ronin

  • Guest
Re: martial arts photography?
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2006, 01:38:15 PM »

Any one ever done motorcross or car racing photography?

here is some of my stuff (speedway)

http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=499747

Have lost more but its all needs to be scanned and i got real lazy real quick with a DSLR

Off on another car shoot soon.

http://www.dynaxdigital.com/index.php/topic,783.0.html


Offline xeroid

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 353
  • Gender: Male
    • Brent H Russell
Re: martial arts photography?
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2006, 02:02:58 AM »
Here I am, just spotted this. Hi Annaiso.

I haven't done much indoor sport pix but the problems I'd see would be lack of good light, colour temperature and fast movements of the combatant(s)
White balance can fix the second, the others are very dependent on your lens and lighting capability.

For actual 'fight' shots:
Centre spot focus, ISO 800 to get stop motion, continuous focussing, and multishot. You may find preset manual focus or prefocus and hold works but with wide open aperture and lots of opponent movement the depth of field may not be enough and you'll get soft shots. 

Rear sync your flash for main lighting and will help colour balance. If you can add a few extra side lights to fill shadows and reduce harsh contrast the camera should cope with the rest reasonably well. I will use P mode ( not the green fully auto ) and preset ISO then let camera sort out f and speed for itself. Depending on your flash you may need to set speed to 1/160 if it isn't a KM unit with control. The 1/160 requirement for the flash will conflict with need for fast shutter for stop motion so you may get body ok but arm movement all fuzzed.

Lens ...... I'd have my 28-105 on, close enough not to require huge flash but I'd be staying back far enough to follow movement of combatants ( and to keep me outa trouble - same with rally cars LOL ).  Zoom for framing.

Portrait is portrait, I ain't the expert there but posed shots in fight stances etc fit into that category.

Take lots of shots, and check results as you do, that's what LCD, Histogram, EXIF data are there for. If something ain't working change it till it does. Use the close up to chk blur, both movement and focussing because that's probably where your biggest problem will lie.

Hope this helps a bit, be interested to see a few pix later.

Cheers
Brent
KM 7D, SONY SLT-A77V

Offline annaiso

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 99
Re: martial arts photography?
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2006, 11:39:00 AM »
cheers guys all advice greatly appreciated.

Just spent 20 mins making notes.

As soon as im sorted out with a flash im arranging to take the shots and hopefully (if i ever learn) will post pics on site.

Offline ISO3200

  • Past Moderator
  • Friend of DynaxDigital
  • *****
  • Posts: 1551
  • Gender: Male
  • Shaken, not blurred...
Re: martial arts photography?
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2006, 06:27:53 PM »
Sounds like great fun.

I can't say I'd be any good at photographing kickboxing, but I admire contact sports as much as any other kind and would love to try and shoot it.

You'd want to capture the energy and physical prowess of the combatants and I think lighting is going to be everything here. You could try rear-flash, so we have the blur or a leg or arm and then a sharp image of a kick, etc. I suppose it will depend on how comfortable and patient your subjects are. You could always slip them £30 to hang around and do exactly what you wanted them to do.

If you get a good result be sure to post it.
SB-400, 28-200/3.5-5.6 AF G, 50/1.8 AF D, 60/2.8 AF D Micro-Nikkor, 105/2.8 AF-S VR G Micro-Nikkor, 70-180/4.5-5.6 AF D Micro-Nikkor, 200/4 AF D Micro-Nikkor, 70-300/4.5-5.6 AF-S VR G, Nikon PB-6... Yes I quite like macro.

Offline Akshay Jamwal

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 639
Re: martial arts photography?
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2006, 07:10:36 PM »
Try some slow rear flash sync. 


You'd want to capture the energy and physical prowess of the combatants and I think lighting is going to be everything here. You could try rear-flash, so we have the blur or a leg or arm and then a sharp image of a kick, etc. I suppose it will depend on how comfortable and patient your subjects are. You could always slip them £30 to hang around and do exactly what you wanted them to do.

I'd have to whole-heartedly agree with that. I've taken a few shots of my dog on the beach (while he was running) and used rear-sync to freeze him while panning. Will upload/link the photo if I can. It isn't spectacular, but it could be. Unfortunately, I'm kind of lazy.

Re: not blinding someone by mistake, I'd try bouncing the flash off the ceiling or off a wall in any case. Or perhaps attaching some sort of diffuser on the head.

« Last Edit: February 11, 2006, 07:17:49 PM by Akshay Jamwal »
Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships.  ~Ansel Adams