Author Topic: Flies  (Read 22692 times)

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Offline rogprov

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Flies
« on: August 20, 2011, 09:10:03 PM »























Roger

Offline vaughaag

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Re: Flies
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2011, 09:19:36 PM »
Very nice indeed, the 1st and 3rd are my faves.

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Offline wildieswife

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Re: Flies
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2011, 10:10:01 PM »
Second and last for me!  Lovely images. I took one of #3 yesterday - he has beautifully pearlescent eyes :) #4 is a flesh fly  - they have very muscly legs, don't they?

Pat

PS - You're not supposed to put more than 5 in one post - I usually split it into 2 posts. I reply to myself with the rest of the images ;)
Often while traveling with a camera we arrive just as the sun slips over the horizon of a moment, too late to expose film, only time enough to expose our hearts.  ~Minor White

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Offline Stef.

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Re: Flies
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2011, 11:46:07 PM »
Absolutely stunning shots!!! It's very hard for me to choose a "best" one- they are all superb!
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Offline chappo1

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Re: Flies
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2011, 11:55:57 PM »
I agree with Stef word for word.  Are they dead like Dave's ?  Are they stacked?  How do you get the little buggers to sit still?
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Offline REX (aka TG)

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Re: Flies
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2011, 07:09:07 AM »
Excellent set Bravo rogprov
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Offline rogprov

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Re: Flies
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2011, 08:52:19 AM »
I agree with Stef word for word.  Are they dead like Dave's ?  Are they stacked?  How do you get the little buggers to sit still?
Don't tease, tell us how....john

Thanks to all for the nice comments - I must remember the 5 limit Pat - thanks for reminding me.

They are neither dead subjects or stacked images but I do try to maximise what little DoF there is available by the angle of the shot.

You will notice that the majority are taken where the creature has its least depth - side on. If I'd taken a head-on shot much of the insect would be have been out of focus. As an example, the first shot is at a diagonal and I've had to sacrifice focus of the far wing.

I use the a900 in aperture priority with the Sony 100mm macro lens usually at about f10 but I do go as small as f18 at times even though it means a diffusion hit

I try to keep ISO at 400 but in poor lighting (I almost never use a flash) I'll go as fast as 2000.

I use centre spot focus and metering, always hand-held (there's no time to set up a tripod with these critters). With image stabilisation I'll use exposures as slow as 1/20th second but obviously prefer higher whenever possible.

I nearly always use autofocus and the trick here is speed. The shutter must be fired the instant the camera finds focus – almost simultaneously. The tiniest delay whilst hand-holding at these magnifications will guarantee you've moved and even the smallest amount means the shot will not be focussed correctly.

I always use raw and all processing is with The Gimp running in Linux OS. Many shots are quite heavy crops from the original.
Roger

Offline wildieswife

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Re: Flies
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2011, 11:13:37 AM »
I agree with Stef word for word.  Are they dead like Dave's ?  Are they stacked?  How do you get the little buggers to sit still?
Don't tease, tell us how....john

Thanks to all for the nice comments - I must remember the 5 limit Pat - thanks for reminding me.

They are neither dead subjects or stacked images but I do try to maximise what little DoF there is available by the angle of the shot.

You will notice that the majority are taken where the creature has its least depth - side on. If I'd taken a head-on shot much of the insect would be have been out of focus. As an example, the first shot is at a diagonal and I've had to sacrifice focus of the far wing.

I use the a900 in aperture priority with the Sony 100mm macro lens usually at about f10 but I do go as small as f18 at times even though it means a diffusion hit

I try to keep ISO at 400 but in poor lighting (I almost never use a flash) I'll go as fast as 2000.

I use centre spot focus and metering, always hand-held (there's no time to set up a tripod with these critters). With image stabilisation I'll use exposures as slow as 1/20th second but obviously prefer higher whenever possible.

I nearly always use autofocus and the trick here is speed. The shutter must be fired the instant the camera finds focus – almost simultaneously. The tiniest delay whilst hand-holding at these magnifications will guarantee you've moved and even the smallest amount means the shot will not be focussed correctly.

I always use raw and all processing is with The Gimp running in Linux OS. Many shots are quite heavy crops from the original.

Very helpful rundown of handy tips - thankyou! More or less the same as me but I wouldn't go as high as ISO 2000 or use an aperture of more than 11-14. I also mostly use Auto focus.The extra pixels on the 900 must help with cropping in - which in turn will help the DOF.

You can only really do an all in focus shot, like Vaughag's cricket which is head on, when you stack. It's possible to do a very quick 2-3 stack of some insects when they're obviously settled (or busy mating) - but even then you may find 'doubles' and some artifacts. The grasshopper I did yesterday was breathing - so his abdomen was moving ;) Any more (say of a snail) and you really should have a windless situation with a tripod!
 
Wind can be a problem - a good way to photograph on a windy day is to shield the subject (if poss) or better still - get down and dirty at ground level - there's no wind there ;)
 I remember last year I was really irritated when some Lancashire men, that we see out and about with big lenses,  told me with great sagacity (Lancashire men always know more than women) that it was a waste of time me macro-ing in windy weather and laughed at me lying on the ground.  I got some great grasshopper shots down there.

Pat
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 12:29:02 PM by wildieswife »
Often while traveling with a camera we arrive just as the sun slips over the horizon of a moment, too late to expose film, only time enough to expose our hearts.  ~Minor White

Gear - Sony Alpha77 /Minolta 300mm f4 /Tamron XR DiII SP 17-50mm f2.8 / Minolta 28-80mm/Tamron Di 90mm macro . And various slaves/lights and studio stuff.