Author Topic: Copyright Questions.  (Read 1265 times)

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Offline Ballacraine

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Copyright Questions.
« on: February 20, 2012, 12:47:42 PM »
I am considering a photoshoot of a model.
As there is a considerable (for me) outlay involved and the results would likely appear on the net, I would like to ask any professional photographers here a few copyright related questions, please?

I know how to watermark so that is not an issue for me.
That said I am sure they would be fairly easy to remove, if anyone had a mind to.

If they are able to do that, no doubt they would be able to alter other areas of the photograph & claim it as their own work?

At what point could they be justified in doing that?
Are we just looking at bit of cloning, cropping or resizing?

Any input would be welcome.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 12:49:13 PM by Ballacraine »
Is it chaos out of order, or order out of chaos?...... I am never quite sure.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ballacraine/
( Not much in there yet.....Gotta sort & upload ;) )

Offline Faldrax

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2012, 01:35:39 PM »
I'm not a professional photographer (or a lawyer), but have read a number of discussions on copyright of photographs.

The consensus seems to be that if you put photos on the net, then if someone wants to 'steal' them they will.

With regards to copyright - unless you explicitly give copyright to someone else it belongs to you as the photographer (exception is if you are taking photographs as part of a regular job, when it will usually belong to your employer).

Can someone take a copy of your image, edit it and claim it as their own without your permission? - no (it may be OK to take a small portion and include it in a larger work, I'm not sure on that).

If they do, can you do anything about it? - In theory, yes.
You can demand they stop using it, pay a licence, etc. but they may just ignore you.
You can take it up with the web hosting company (but don't expect much luck if they are based abroad).

In general, try to avoid posting images at high resolutions - if you  post at 800x600, for example things look fine on the web, but won't have the detail for larger prints, etc, so are less likely to be used commercially by someone else.
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Offline Ballacraine

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 01:47:10 PM »
Thanks for that informative reply, Faldrax.
It is much appreciated. :0)


This would be my first photoshoot.

I take it a model release would mean that the model held no copyright anyway?

What if she were to appear with her name changed for instance?
I know models may change their working names during their careers as well, but I am talking about appearing under a name changed by a pirate?


« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 01:51:06 PM by Ballacraine »
Is it chaos out of order, or order out of chaos?...... I am never quite sure.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ballacraine/
( Not much in there yet.....Gotta sort & upload ;) )

Offline Faldrax

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 04:02:39 PM »
Again, based on reading various threads, I believe a model release form is not actually required in the UK - the default position is that you, as the photographer, retains copyright.

However, if you do use a model release form, it does form a 'written contract' of sorts, and means that the terms of the shot are clear to all before you start, which can help avoid disputes later.

If the deal does involve you supplying image files to the model afterwards I would suggest you also include a written 'licence' for their use for their use of them - including any rights to modify the image. It won't stop them doing what they want with them later, but does make it harder for them to claim they had a right to something they didn't.
It is difficult to explain to white mice that black cats are lucky...

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Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/36503683@N08/

Offline Andrewbarrettuk

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2012, 06:02:04 PM »
From how I read this the model is charging and wants images, if so what are you getting from this? Model release forms aren't required in the uk as far as I know, I always get clients to sign a contract which basically says copyright is mine and nobody can reproduce any images without my permission and I can use images as I please. If you want a copy let me know

Offline Bigbreakfast

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2012, 06:47:05 PM »
Agree with all above - as photographer you own the copyright. If you are planning to sell the image it would be worth getting a release as some stock photo companies expect them and the same may be true if you sold for commercial advertising. Have a look here for a template you can use http://www.professionalphotographer.co.uk/Magazine/Downloads/Model-Release-Form
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Offline Ballacraine

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2012, 11:34:03 PM »
Many thanks for the input.

The link to the draft model release was particularly useful.

Balla. :0)
Is it chaos out of order, or order out of chaos?...... I am never quite sure.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ballacraine/
( Not much in there yet.....Gotta sort & upload ;) )

Offline chappo1

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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2012, 05:14:14 AM »
I only take images for the fun of it and if anyone wants a copy they can have it.  That being said, I agree with Faldrax, put up a low res 72dpi image with a note to contact the photographer for a higher resolution copy.  If anyone tries altering a 72 dpi image they will soon get into quality difficulties and I doube anyone would then be interested.

Try it.  Save an image at 72dpi in sRGB colour space then try and modify the image yourself.  You will soon see the issues...john
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Re: Copyright Questions.
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2012, 05:14:14 AM »