Author Topic: old sky .... new sky  (Read 2142 times)

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Offline 5DandMe

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old sky .... new sky
« on: November 09, 2006, 09:09:07 AM »
below is a stock photo i took some months back, because of the plant growing out of the vent pipe. as i was new to digital photography i didn't alow for the bright sky and ended up with a blown-out very white sky. with a little help from photoshop i was able to make the shot look somewhat better by replacing the old sky with a shiney new blue one. it was a case of magic wand the house and copy and paste it to a blue sky photo, then just crop to suit



If I pushed a copy of myself off a cliff because he was swearing could I be charged with making an obscene clone fall?

Offline gazraa

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Re: old sky .... new sky
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2006, 10:33:33 AM »
there is another way you can use layer blending modes to add a sky that will work round the edges of intricate shapes like trees and leaves, and it doesn't involve use the magic wand, although you might need to do some masking afterwards.

If you have a very light/white sky in your image, and the objects in the foreground are a lot darker, then you can use the Darken Blending mode to put a sky in.

Here's basically what you do:

1. open image with white sky
2. open sky image
3. drag sky layer into white sky image and position as required. The sky layer should be at the top.
4. change the blending mode of the sky layer to Darken (Multiply can also work)
5. Now any pixel in the sky layer that is darker than the whie sky layer below it will show through.
6. apply a layer mask to the sky layer and mask out anything that's overlapping things it shouldn't.

You should notice that it does a good job of getting right up to the edges around intricate shapes.

You could also, instead of the magic wand tool, make a more accurate selection around the house and plant etc by using a channels method of selection where you:

1. pick the most contrasty colour channel (usually blue)
2. duplicate it
3. use levels to black it out as much as possible leaving a silhouette of the shape you want to select
4. fill in any gaps caused by highlights with the black brush
5. Ctrl + mouse click on the layer inset thumbnail part to select everything (you may need to inverse selection to get the black bit)
6. then copy and paste into the sky image and position, or use the selection for an accurate mask.

But you all knew that didn't you :)
Street Photographer | Portfolio | Photography Basics Fujifilm X-Pro2 | Fujifilm X-Pro1

Offline 5DandMe

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Re: old sky .... new sky
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2006, 11:58:31 AM »
Quote
But you all knew that didn't you

i didn't know that......but i do now...thanks gazraa

when i get the chance i will try it out
If I pushed a copy of myself off a cliff because he was swearing could I be charged with making an obscene clone fall?

Offline fother

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Re: old sky .... new sky
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2006, 11:04:21 PM »

Nice job there 5DandMe.

Gaz, as usual a very good set of instructions - gonna put them to the test when I get a spare half hour...

:)