Author Topic: Do you take as much time as you would with film?  (Read 4041 times)

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Offline gazraa

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Do you take as much time as you would with film?
« on: May 25, 2005, 05:04:12 PM »
So you've now got your shiny digital SLR, do you find that you take as much time setting up, composing and getting the best shot as you did with film, or do you just take more pictures and choose the best one?

Even with my digital point and shoot I have found myself taking the shot I want, but then taking a few more from different angles etc just in case it comes out better when I look at it on my computer.
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Offline alane

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More time with DSLR
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2005, 07:26:30 PM »
I have found that using the DSLR has made me think more about the pictures I am taking and made me use more of the camera's settings.

The fact that I can review the shot straight away and instantly see the effects of changing shutter and aperture mean I am learning more about exposure and what works best in what situation

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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2005, 09:09:54 PM »
I think more, because I know I can see/check the result immediately.  So when it bums out I am forced to think/try again.

Offline Akshay Jamwal

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Do you take as much time as you would with film?
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2005, 07:52:20 AM »
For me it depends on the situation and what film you're shooting. If I'm shooting negatives, then I probably spend more time with digital. Negatives have a higher exposure latitude and you don't generally have to worry about overexposure (unless you really botched it up), while with the digital you have to be relatively careful.

If I'm shooting slides, then I most probably will take more time with the slides. This depends on the photographic situation, whether I'm going to be using filters or not, etc. If I'm using ND filters then I'm definitely going to be taking more time with film. I don't use them with the digital anymore. There are programs and plugins for Photoshop these days that offer High Dynamic Range, so I've begun to experiment with that. Taking 5 shots with different EVs and then combining them is less bothersome than carefully aligning an ND filter or two with (say) the horizon.
With a digital, there's also, of course, the added advantage of being able to review and simply delete any errors. No one really wants to waste film due to the costs involved.

I still favour film over digital when it comes to landscapes, however. If I had a full frame camera I'd probably experiment more... and I say probably because I still think films such as Velvia or E100VS are more suited for landscape photography. This is only my opinion however. I'm not trying to start yet another film vs. digital debate, nor do I wish to participate in one.
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Offline ISO3200

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Do you take as much time as you would with film?
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2005, 06:09:25 PM »
I miss the tolerance of film, but not the waiting. Digital will probably catch up and then I won't miss the tolerance. :wink:
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« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2005, 07:33:08 PM »
Quote from: dcap
I think more, because I know I can see/check the result immediately.  So when it bums out I am forced to think/try again.


I now shoot a lot more than with film.  And I'm a lot happier with the pics too.  When I shoot less, I tend to keep more than I ever did in my E6 days.

E6 - slide, you remember them!  

Or was it K4 - who knows what that is then?  Test :!: